What is the relationship between the number of kanban cards in a process and its inventory level?

Question: What is the relationship between the number of Kanban cards in a process and the inventory level? A. The inventory of the process grows with the square root of the number of Kanban cards.

What happens to the number of Kanban cards in the process if the replenishment time goes up?

What happens to the number of Kanban cards in the process if the replenishment time goes up? … Waste = The needless waste of time and worker movements that ought to be eliminated immediately.

Which car company is most often associated with the term lean operations?

Toyota Motor Corporation’s vehicle production system is a way of making things that is sometimes referred to as a “lean manufacturing system,” or a “Just-in-Time (JIT) system,” and has come to be well known and studied worldwide.

What is the roof in the house shaped representation of the Toyota Production System quizlet?

What is the roof in the “house-shaped” representation of the Toyota Production System? Taiichi Ohno built the Toyota Production System with the metaphor of a tiger in mind. Rapid and decisive movements were in his view the best way to match supply with demand.

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How are Kanban levels calculated?

Use the Kanban size formula (A) x (B) x (C) x (D) and assume that part number ABC has an annual usage of 3,900 widgets. Compute the weekly usage = 3900 / 52 weeks = 75 widgets per week. Determine the supplier lead time; in this example, assume it is two weeks.

How does takt time change as demand rate increases?

How does the takt time change as the demand rate increases? C A process has high fixed cost and low variable costs. It is currently capacity constrained. … If the takt time is shorter than the cycle time, the process needs to run faster.

Which one of the following is a consequence of uneven workflow?

Which one of the following is a consequence of uneven workflow? Overburdening of workers and equipment.

What are the 7 wastes?

Under the lean manufacturing system, seven wastes are identified: overproduction, inventory, motion, defects, over-processing, waiting, and transport.